Worship during Lent

Henry Nouwen once described Lent as the season during which winter and spring struggle with each other for dominance. It is an appropriate image because during this time of year the darkness and light within each of us can become locked in conflict. We are called not only to examine the integrity of our own motives but to work courageously for justice in the world around us.

Lent, which means springtime, is traditionally a six-week period of abstinence and repentance in preparation for Easter. As the buds open on trees and the days lengthen, this is a spiritual season which calls for greater openness to the word of God and a conversion in every area of our lives. It is a time to face the darkness within and expose it to the light.

It is with this in mind that the worship committee met and has put together our liturgies for the 5 pm, 8:30 am,  and 10:30 am services of worship.

Saturday at 5 pm

This service is specifically designed to incorporate elements of Anglican monastic and Taizé worship. Anglican monastic worship is characterized by quiet singing, solemn action, and an unhurried pace. Taizé is a religious community in France that is known for its unique, meditative music, and use periods of silence for prayer and contemplation. It is requested that participants enter in silence and seek to maintain silence until the service begins. This service will be offered with the appropriate theme of Lent. Read more about worship in the Taizé tradition.

Sunday at 8:30 am – Rite II

We begin with a silent procession. The first Sunday of Lent will see us using the Great Litany. The following Sundays of Lent we will use a reciting and response of the 10 commandments (the Decalogue). The responses in the prayers of the people will have a more penitential note. We will use Rite II, Eucharistic prayer D. The Agnus Dei (Lamb of God) will be said. Finally, because this is a penitential season, we will ask those who are physically able to kneel anytime we are saying prayers. This will be in contrast to Easter when we will ask everyone to stand during the 50-day season (which is not a penitential season.)

Sunday at 10:30 am – Rite I

We begin with a silent procession. The first Sunday of Lent will see us using the Great Litany. The following Sundays of Lent we will use a reciting and response of the 10 commandments (the Decalogue). The responses in the prayers of the people will have a more penitential note. We will use Rite I, Eucharistic prayer 1. The Agnus Dei (Lamb of God) will be said as well as the Prayer of Humble Access. Finally, because this is a penitential season, we will ask those who are physically able to kneel anytime we are saying prayers. This will be in contrast to Easter when we will ask everyone to stand during the 50-day season (which is not a penitential season.)

Our journey with Christ

Come, O Life-giving Creator,
and rattle the door latch
of our slumbering hearts.

Awaken us as you breathe upon
a winter-wrapped earth,
gently calling to life virgin Spring.

Awaken in these fortified days
of Lenten prayer and discipline
our youthful dreams of holiness.

Call us forth from the prison camp
of our numerous past defeats
and our narrow patterns of being
to make our ordinary life extra-ordinarily alive,
through the passion of our love.

Show to us during these Lenten days
how to take the daily things of life
and submerging them in the sacred,
to infuse them with a great love
for you, O God, and for others.

Guide us to perform simple acts of love and prayer,
the real works of reform and renewal
of this overture to the spring of the Spirit.

O Father of Jesus,
help us not to waste
these precious Lenten days
of our soul’s spiritual springtime.

–Edward Hays

May God continue to bless and keep you on your journey with Christ.

Categories: Lent 2014, NewsTags: ,